NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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CLOSING THE CIRCLE - FALL 2019

National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health | 10/28/2019 | Indigenous health NCCIH

Tansi! The leaves have turned colour and the air is crisp in the traditional territories of the Lheidli T'enneh First Nation, upon which the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health (NCCIH) is located. It is a great time to warm up by the fire with some fresh baked bannock and hot tea, and to appreciate these colourful autumn months. This seasonal shift also gives us the chance to report on some of our recent activities.

NCCIH newsletter link | Mailing list sign up

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Video: mite achimowin - Heart Talk Introduction

Introduction - Digital Story Research Project

The short video mite achimowin: Heart Talk – First Nations Women’s Expressions of Heart Health Digital Story Research Project, provides an introduction to the project and Indigenous and biomedical models that lend to heart health and wellness.

Read the report | Read the web story | Watch on Vimeo | Listen on SoundCloud

 

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Understanding First Nations women’s heart health

Indigenous peoples generally, and First Nations women specifically, are experiencing disproportionately higher rates of chronic conditions and cardiovascular disease compared to the general Canadian population. This paper examines the context of First Nations women’s heart health, with a particular view to understanding the role of colonization in the prevalence of and risk factors for heart diseases, and in diagnosing and treating them. Beyond colonization, authors Diffey, Fontaine and Schultz situate First Nations women’s burden of heart-related illness and risk factors for the disease within a determinants of health framework, including racism and gender. They weave first hand narratives of First Nations women into the paper in order to highlight their unique perspectives and experiences of surviving cardiovascular disease as well as their cultural understandings of heart health. The paper concludes by identifying a number of strategies for closing the gap in First Nations women’s heart health, as well as the challenges and barriers that still need to be addressed.

Read the web story | Watch the videos

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Family violence as a social determinant of First Nations, Inuit and Métis health

This fact sheet explores family violence as a determinant of health for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis individuals, families and communities. It provides an overview of the potential physical health, mental health and social impacts of family violence on individuals across the life span. It also examines the prevalence of various types of family violence, the risk factors that contribute to family violence generally, and the unique context that increases the vulnerability of Indigenous women to family violence specifically.

Addressing family violence in Indigenous communities is a complex issue because of the diverse socio-economic, geographic, political, cultural and historical barriers that operate at the individual, family, community and system levels. The fact sheet then examines barriers that inhibit Indigenous victims of violence from reporting it, prevent them from leaving violent situations, and constrain efforts to effectively reduce family violence within Indigenous communities. The fact sheet concludes by presenting a wide-array of promising approaches for family violence prevention and intervention in these settings. These approaches are multi-faceted and multi-dimensional, targeted at the level of individuals, communities, systems and policy and operating across multiple domains (legal, education, health and social services).

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Oxford Bibliographies: Cultural Safety

This annotated online Oxford Bibliographies, written by NCCAH staff Regine Halseth, Roberta Stout, and Donna Atkinson, aims to enhance understanding of ‘cultural safety’ in health care by providing a brief overview of the most relevant literature in this field, including what cultural safety is and how it differs from other related concepts, methods to enhance learning about cultural safety, and the various health contexts in which it can be applied (policy, practice and research).

DOI: 10.1093/0B0/9780199756797-0192 | Oxford Bibliographies subscription required to access

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Podcast: Jared Bullard - Congenital syphilis

Across Canada, syphilis continues to mostly affect men who have sex with men, but on the Prairies, rates are also high among heterosexual women. In this conversation, the last in a series produced by the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases in conjunction with the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health, we’ll hear from Dr. Jared Bullard, a paediatric infectious disease specialist at the University of Manitoba who works primarily out of the Children’s Hospital in Winnipeg. He’ll discuss recent increases in cases of congenital syphilis, the risks it poses to a foetus, as well as prevention strategies. He spoke with NCCID’s Jami Neufeld.

Read the full transcript on the NCCID web site

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Overcoming barriers to culturally safe and appropriate dementia care services and supports for Indigenous peoples in Canada

National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health | 10/17/2018 | Aboriginal Health, Cultural safety, First Nations health, Indigenous health Report, Resource List NCCIH

As individuals age, memory loss can sometimes occur, resulting from both the natural aging process as well as from medical conditions like Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias that are progressively degenerative and irreversible. Dementias can affect an individual’s daily functioning and quality of life, as well as place a significant burden on family caregivers. While little is known about dementias among Indigenous populations in Canada, they are recognized as an emerging health issue in these communities. The Indigenous seniors population, while proportionately smaller than the general Canadian population, has been growing rapidly and rates of dementias are expected to increase due to a higher prevalence of risk factors in the development of the disease, including diabetes, midlife hypertension and obesity, physical inactivity, lower levels of education, and smoking. Further, Indigenous people face a host of barriers in accessing health care, including access to dementia care services and supports.

This paper aims to identify the challenges and burdens Indigenous people in Canada face in accessing culturally safe and appropriate dementia care services and supports, and suggests ways of overcoming these challenges. It begins by providing an overview of the general challenges Indigenous seniors face in accessing health services, then summarizes the literature on Indigenous perspectives of aging well and caring for loved ones with dementia, as understanding these perspectives is essential for developing programs and services that are responsive to their needs. Key elements of a culturally safe framework for dementia care for Indigenous communities and examples of innovative dementia care services for Indigenous peoples concludes the paper.

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The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and Indigenous Peoples in Canada

National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health | 10/02/2018 | Aboriginal Health, Indigenous health, Social determinants of health and health equity NCCIH

In 2015, the United Nations released a new 15-year agenda, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Unlike its predecessor, the Millennium Development Goals Agenda, which focused on eradicating hunger and poverty in only the poorest countries, the SDGs Agenda aims to eradicate poverty in all its forms everywhere, while also addressing the global challenge of sustainable development. This report provides a brief history of the SDGs and an overview of Indigenous peoples in Canada. It then assesses the current state of progress on the SDG targets for Indigenous peoples in Canada and suggests ways that the SDG agenda can be used to improve Indigenous peoples’ socio-economic and health outcomes. The report underscores the role that poverty plays in the health disparities Indigenous people face and the need for comprehensive poverty alleviation strategies that address the various situations that lead to and result from poverty to ensure Indigenous people in Canada are not left behind during the period of the SDGs. This includes addressing issues related to environmental conservation and development, Indigenous peoples’ self-determination, governance, and land rights, as well as socio-economic inequities.

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Children and Their Vision: What Parents and Teachers Need to Know

National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health | 08/15/2018 | Aboriginal Health, Children & youth NCCIH

Children rarely complain when they have vision problems because they don’t know that their vision isn’t normal. They think that everyone sees the world the way they do. Parents and teachers have an important responsibility to recognize the signs of vision problems in order to identify children who need a complete eye examination.

Children and Their Vision: What Parents and Teachers Need to Know contains accessible information about why establishing comprehensive eye care early in life is important for a child's long term development.

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