NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Assessing the Applicability and Transferability of Evidence

This module will help you understand and use a structured process and criteria for adapting research evidence to local public health decision-making using the Applicability and Transferability (A&T) Tool with a relevant public health scenario.

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Exploring socially-responsive approaches to children’s rehabilitation with Indigenous communities, families and children

National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health | 03/14/2018 | NCCIH 1.1 Health knowledge, 1.2 Health system knowledge, 1.4 Use evidence and research , 2.5 Determine meaning

Indigenous children are often denied timely access to critical healthcare and social services that are available to other Canadian children. This is primarily due to chronic underfunding and jurisdictional disputes and confusion over the funding of services. To ensure that Indigenous children have equitable opportunities, developmental and health trajectories, and quality of life and well-being across their life course as non-Indigenous children do, a critical examination of Indigenous children’s rehabilitation is needed.

This paper, authored by Alison Gerlach, PhD, summarizes knowledge about rehabilitation for Indigenous children with developmental challenges, disabilities, and complex health conditions. It explores the relevancy of the concepts of ‘disability’ and ‘rehabilitation’ within the settler-colonial context of Canada, highlights emerging themes in the literature on rehabilitation with Indigenous children in Canada, and identifies current gaps in knowledge and areas for future research. The paper argues that in order for children’s rehabilitation to be responsive to the lived realities of Indigenous communities and families, service delivery models, policies and practices must be informed by an understanding of dis/ability in relation to the multifaceted, historical, and ongoing effects of colonization. This requires a radical shift in service delivery grounded in Indigenous self-determination and human rights.

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Using Evidence in Public Health Decisions: Why it Matters

In this video series, four Canadian experts explain why evidence-informed decision making is essential for public health. David Mowat, Carol Timmings, Gaynor Watson-Creed and Jocelyne Sauvé talk candidly about the impact that using evidence has had on their practices.

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A gaps analysis to improve health equity knowledge and practices

This gap analysis by the NCCDH focuses attention on the most pressing needs in advancing health equity in public health. It offers guidance for researchers, policy-makers, government decision-makers and public health practitioners.

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An Introduction to the Health of Two-Spirit People: Historical, contemporary and emergent issues

Two-Spirit is a term that encompasses a broad range of sexual and gender identities of Aboriginal peoples, including those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ). This paper, authored by Dr. Sarah Hunt, introduces the historical, contemporary and emergent issues related to Two-Spirit health. Integral to this discussion is that Two-Spirit health is understood within the context of colonialism and heteropatriarchy, as well as in the current resurgence of Two-Spirit peoples’ gender roles and sexual identities.

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Webinar: Cultural safety for Indigenous peoples: A determinant of health

A NCCIH webinar, co-hosted with Northern Health, was held on February 17, 2016 on “Cultural safety for Indigenous peoples: A determinant of health.” Dr. Sarah de Leeuw, Associate Professor in the Northern Medical Program, University of Northern British Columbia and a Research Associate for the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health, explored how racism has manifested in the way health care services are provided to Indigenous peoples and is thus a barrier to their optimal health. Specifically, the presentation highlighted the ways in which Indigenous people have expressed their realities of experiencing racism, and discussed ways that healthcare professionals might engage with the arts and humanities in order to more deeply reflect on their thoughts about racism and Indigenous peoples. The webinar attracted great interest, with 366 participants in attendance.

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The Settings Approach in Public Health: Thinking about Schools in Infectious Disease Prevention and Control

The purpose of this Purple Paper is to consider the settings approach to health promotion in schools, specifically with respect to infectious disease, and to stimulate considerations for the development of a framework to further advance partnerships and collaboration between public health and the education sector in Canada. It is also intended to provide a context for considerations and reviews of more specific policy options for prevention and control of infectious diseases in schools as well as in many other settings.

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Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of Aboriginal Peoples Health

Authors Charlotte Reading, PhD, and Fred Wien, PhD, use available data to describe health inequalities experienced by diverse Aboriginal peoples in Canada, linking social determinants to health inequalities. Many of these determinants, such as poverty, substandard housing, and barriers to education, are rooted in contexts specific to Indigenous peoples, including a history of colonization impacting culture, languages, land rights and self-determination. The authors present a conceptual framework for understanding social determinants across the lifespan, and note that complex interactions between social determinants and health are just starting to be mapped out and demonstrated empirically by researchers.

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