NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Fact sheet: Environmental Health Risks of Personal Cannabis Cultivation

Personal cultivation as described by the Cannabis Act (2017) will permit adults to cultivate up to four cannabis plants per household as of October 17, 2018. The Canadian Federal government will be responsible for regulating and enforcing industry-wide standards for commercial producers, while the provinces and territories will be responsible for overseeing the distribution and sale of cannabis, as well as developing guidelines and rules for growing cannabis at home. This fact sheet identifies health and safety concerns that may be relevant for personal cultivation and recommends key messages to help mitigate some of these risks.

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Evidence-Informed Decision Making Casebook

Every day in Canada, research evidence is used to inform decisions in public health. We’ve collected stories from across the country that highlight the use of evidence to inform public health practice, programs and policy in Canada.

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Growing at Home: Health and Safety Concerns for Personal Cannabis Cultivation

Personal cultivation as described by the proposed Cannabis Act (2017) will permit adults to cultivate up to four cannabis plants per household. This provision is intended to both promote equity by facilitating access to legal cannabis, particularly when retail outlets are difficult to access, and to undercut the black market. However, indoor cultivation and processing of cannabis may also introduce or exacerbate certain environmental health risks in the home. This document identifies health and safety concerns that may be relevant to personal cultivation after legalization – that is, legal home growing and the associated health risks.

Although this information may be of relevance to the public at large, the evidence presented here has been synthesized and organized for policy- and decision-makers, environmental and medical health officers, and other public health professionals. This review thus serves as a launching point for considering both wide-scale and regionally oriented preventive actions to mitigate the environmental health risks that may arise from growing at home.

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Exploring socially-responsive approaches to children’s rehabilitation with Indigenous communities, families and children

National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health | 03/14/2018 | NCCIH 1.1 Health knowledge, 1.2 Health system knowledge, 1.4 Use evidence and research , 2.5 Determine meaning

Indigenous children are often denied timely access to critical healthcare and social services that are available to other Canadian children. This is primarily due to chronic underfunding and jurisdictional disputes and confusion over the funding of services. To ensure that Indigenous children have equitable opportunities, developmental and health trajectories, and quality of life and well-being across their life course as non-Indigenous children do, a critical examination of Indigenous children’s rehabilitation is needed.

This paper, authored by Alison Gerlach, PhD, summarizes knowledge about rehabilitation for Indigenous children with developmental challenges, disabilities, and complex health conditions. It explores the relevancy of the concepts of ‘disability’ and ‘rehabilitation’ within the settler-colonial context of Canada, highlights emerging themes in the literature on rehabilitation with Indigenous children in Canada, and identifies current gaps in knowledge and areas for future research. The paper argues that in order for children’s rehabilitation to be responsive to the lived realities of Indigenous communities and families, service delivery models, policies and practices must be informed by an understanding of dis/ability in relation to the multifaceted, historical, and ongoing effects of colonization. This requires a radical shift in service delivery grounded in Indigenous self-determination and human rights.

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Using Evidence in Public Health Decisions: Why it Matters

In this video series, four Canadian experts explain why evidence-informed decision making is essential for public health. David Mowat, Carol Timmings, Gaynor Watson-Creed and Jocelyne Sauvé talk candidly about the impact that using evidence has had on their practices.

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A Model for Evidence-Informed Decision Making in Public Health

Evidence-informed public health involves integrating the best available research evidence into the decision-making process. Additional factors - community health issues and local context; community and political preferences and actions; and public health resources - create the environment in which that research evidence is interpreted and applied.

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Building your capacity to facilitate health equity action: Learning pathways for public health middle managers

This self-directed learning tool is designed for public health middle-managers with diverse experiences, disciplines and tenure. The tool helps cultivate the knowledge, skills and attitudes public health middle managers need to facilitate the development and implementation of public health strategies and interventions that reduce health inequities.

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A gaps analysis to improve health equity knowledge and practices

This gap analysis by the NCCDH focuses attention on the most pressing needs in advancing health equity in public health. It offers guidance for researchers, policy-makers, government decision-makers and public health practitioners.

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