NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Food Deserts and Food Swamps: A Primer

Our food environments, which include the food that is available to us in our day-to-day environments, is a determinant of what we eat as individuals.

This document is intended for environmental public health professionals, including medical health officers and public health inspectors, as well as other public health professionals such as public health dietitians and health promoters, whose work may include healthy built environments or healthy communities. The document introduces food environments such as food deserts and food swamps, discusses the related health implications, provides the rationale for consideration by non-nutrition professionals, and highlights some opportunities for action and collaboration with provincial and municipal governments, as well as business operators.

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Fact sheet: Environmental Health Risks of Personal Cannabis Cultivation

Personal cultivation as described by the Cannabis Act (2017) will permit adults to cultivate up to four cannabis plants per household as of October 17, 2018. The Canadian Federal government will be responsible for regulating and enforcing industry-wide standards for commercial producers, while the provinces and territories will be responsible for overseeing the distribution and sale of cannabis, as well as developing guidelines and rules for growing cannabis at home. This fact sheet identifies health and safety concerns that may be relevant for personal cultivation and recommends key messages to help mitigate some of these risks.

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Growing at Home: Health and Safety Concerns for Personal Cannabis Cultivation

Personal cultivation as described by the proposed Cannabis Act (2017) will permit adults to cultivate up to four cannabis plants per household. This provision is intended to both promote equity by facilitating access to legal cannabis, particularly when retail outlets are difficult to access, and to undercut the black market. However, indoor cultivation and processing of cannabis may also introduce or exacerbate certain environmental health risks in the home. This document identifies health and safety concerns that may be relevant to personal cultivation after legalization – that is, legal home growing and the associated health risks.

Although this information may be of relevance to the public at large, the evidence presented here has been synthesized and organized for policy- and decision-makers, environmental and medical health officers, and other public health professionals. This review thus serves as a launching point for considering both wide-scale and regionally oriented preventive actions to mitigate the environmental health risks that may arise from growing at home.

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A gaps analysis to improve health equity knowledge and practices

This gap analysis by the NCCDH focuses attention on the most pressing needs in advancing health equity in public health. It offers guidance for researchers, policy-makers, government decision-makers and public health practitioners.

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Building a culture of equity in Canadian public health: An environmental scan

This third environmental scan from the NCCDH responds to recent concerns about the Canadian health sector’s significant decline in commitment to public health programs and services. The scan explores implications for the public health sector in undertaking effective action to address the social determinants of health and improve health equity in this context.

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Key public health resources for anti-racism action: A curated list

This reading list is designed to offer a starting point for public health practitioners hoping to deepen their understanding of the causes and implications of structural racism. In addition, the collection highlights different strategies for dismantling racist systems and offers examples of communities that have experience success with these aims.

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The Advisors of Policy Makers: Who Are They, How Do They Handle Scientific Knowledge and What Can We Learn About How to Share Such Knowledge with Them?

When one wishes to share public health knowledge in the hope of influencing public policy development, are policy makers the most relevant actors to target? Despite being often overlooked, the advisors of policy makers play an important role in public policy development. Moreover, when scientific knowledge is used in that process, advisors are the ones who handle such knowledge. This literature review analyzes 70 documents that focus on the observations of advisors themselves, or of actors who rub shoulders with them. It sketches the profile of these advisors: some of them are public servants in departments or in local governments, while others are political advisors in ministerial offices or in the legislative branch. Our paper then describes the work these advisors carry out, especially as it comes to using scientific knowledge. Last, it sets out to pinpoint the influence these advisors have in political circles.

Throughout the document, we draw on findings that emerge from the literature to suggest avenues for reflection to help readers to analyze their own contexts and determine the knowledge-sharing approach most suited to their needs.

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