NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Indigenous Disaster Response

First Nations communities may be disproportionately impacted by a variety of emergencies and disasters, including floods, wildfires, and crude oil spills in their traditional territories.The aim of this topic page is to provide Indigenous communities and environmental health professionals with resources that describe and improve upon the current state of emergency response at the community-, provincial-, and federal-level. Case studies are provided to show the ways in which standard practice has been problematic (e.g., effects of evacuation on kin relationships and land-based activities). Finally, we have included a number of reports that reflect on past events in Indigenous communities, and provide powerful examples for Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities alike trying to recover from disasters.

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Oil Spills and Health

Oil spills are very complex events that, depending on where they occur, may result in acute exposures to nearby human populations. Regardless of the presence of humans, however, oil spills have the potential to produce long-term impacts on human well-being through impacts on ecosystems, food systems, livelihoods, and psychosocial effects. The aim of this topic page is gather resources to understand the potential for the physical and psychosocial impacts of oil spills. We also provide guidance from public health agencies on planning for and responding to oil spills, and resources providing important insight for risk communication during spill events.

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Hepatitis C Virus and Indigenous Peoples

In reviewing the natural history of HCV infection in populations, including the potential role of genetic differences, this webinar covered the specific etiology, prevalence and incidence of HCV infection among Indigenous peoples. The presence of co-morbidities in HCV infection was also discussed, as well as what can be done to address prevalence and incidence within this population.

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Sexually Transmitted Infections & Nursing in Indigenous Communities

The National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases, together with the Aboriginal Nurses Association of Canada, hosted a Google Hangout On-Air about culturally-safe nursing practices and STBBIs in Indigenous communities. The 1-hour webinar was co-led by Clarence Frenchman, a Nurse Manager/HIV Case Coordinator at the Ahtahkakoop Health Centre in Saskatchewan, and Albert McLeod, a cross-cultural consultant/trainer whose work includes a focus on Aboriginal peoples and HIV/AIDS.

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Key public health resources for anti-racism action: A curated list

This reading list is designed to offer a starting point for public health practitioners hoping to deepen their understanding of the causes and implications of structural racism. In addition, the collection highlights different strategies for dismantling racist systems and offers examples of communities that have experience success with these aims.

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Integrated LTBI Care for Refugees: Successes & Challenges at BridgeCare Clinic in Winnipeg

A centuries-old disease, tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health concern globally and the World Health Organization (WHO) is calling for enhanced efforts to eliminate TB worldwide. In this case study, we share the story of the success of BridgeCare Clinic, a model of integrated TB services for government-assisted refugees for its approach to improving latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) treatment completion outcomes in priority populations.

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Webinar: Cultural safety for Indigenous peoples: A determinant of health

A NCCIH webinar, co-hosted with Northern Health, was held on February 17, 2016 on “Cultural safety for Indigenous peoples: A determinant of health.” Dr. Sarah de Leeuw, Associate Professor in the Northern Medical Program, University of Northern British Columbia and a Research Associate for the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health, explored how racism has manifested in the way health care services are provided to Indigenous peoples and is thus a barrier to their optimal health. Specifically, the presentation highlighted the ways in which Indigenous people have expressed their realities of experiencing racism, and discussed ways that healthcare professionals might engage with the arts and humanities in order to more deeply reflect on their thoughts about racism and Indigenous peoples. The webinar attracted great interest, with 366 participants in attendance.

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Towards Cultural Safety for Métis: An introduction for health care providers

This fact sheet aims to demonstrate how health care providers can provide a culturally safe health care environment when caring for Métis patients. Cultural safety is an on-going and evolving process that will require health care providers to revisit and adjust modes of services in order to meet the needs of Métis. Culturally safe health care systems and environments are established by a continuum of building blocks – cultural awareness, cultural sensitivity, and cultural competency.

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Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit: The role of Indigenous knowledge in supporting wellness in Inuit communities in Nunavut

Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit (IQ) is the term used to describe Inuit epistemology or the Indigenous knowledge of the Inuit. The term translates directly as “that which Inuit have always known to be true.” It is the foundation upon which social/emotional, spiritual, cognitive and physical well-being is built. This fact sheet explores the relevance of Inuit traditional knowledge for health and well-being in Inuit communities, and the potential for Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit to be used as a foundation for health and wellness policy and programs.

(also available in Inuktitut)

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Tool for Assessing Applicability and Transferability of Evidence

This tool was created to help public health managers and planners make decisions about local programming priorities. Public health decision-makers who want to incorporate high quality evidence in their programming can use this tool to help determine whether a policy or program is relevant or feasible.

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