NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Children and Their Vision: What Parents and Teachers Need to Know

National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health | 08/15/2018 | Aboriginal Health, Children & youth, NCCAH

Children rarely complain when they have vision problems because they don’t know that their vision isn’t normal. They think that everyone sees the world the way they do. Parents and teachers have an important responsibility to recognize the signs of vision problems in order to identify children who need a complete eye examination.

Children and Their Vision: What Parents and Teachers Need to Know contains accessible information about why establishing comprehensive eye care early in life is important for a child's long term development.

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Identifying and Addressing the Public Health Risks of Splash Parks

Splash parks, also known as splash pads, spray parks, or wet decks, have gained in popularity over the last decade. These interactive parks are artificially created depressions or basins into which water is sprayed, splashed or poured onto visitors; water is not permitted to accumulate, but instead drains immediately out of the play area. Splash parks may take one of two basic designs, which influences the associated public health risks. Non-recirculating or flow-through parks discharge the water directly to waste and present a relatively low risk to their users as the design is based on using fresh potable water. In contrast, recirculating parks collect water in an underground tank, apply some form of water treatment, and re-use the water again. This presents an increased risk of contamination and disease transmission that can be mitigated through proper design and operation.

The objective of this document is to identify risks to public health posed by splash parks, the factors that contribute to this risk, outline practices that can mitigate these risks, and summarize the existing regulatory environment for these facilities. It focuses on epidemiological risks rather than physical hazards such as slip and fall injuries, heat stroke, and foot lacerations.

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Video: Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit - Rhoda's Dream: Burying the Baby

National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health | 12/22/2016 | Aboriginal Health, Children & youth, Indigenous health, Indigenous knowledges, Inuit health, Video, NCCAH

Based on a dream recounted by Rhoda Karetak, this video depicts her encounter and near burial of a baby girl who is gravely ill. Hearing the cries of the baby, Rhoda turns back and pulls the baby back out of the earth. The child's cries turn to giggles and sunshine replaces the dark skies under which this event occurred. Reflecting on this dream, Rhoda draws parallels between burying the sick baby and burying Inuit culture and wisdom, as well as the urgency to revive Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit.

See the related web story

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Sharing their Stories: Narratives of Young Métis Parents and Elders about Parenting

National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health | 08/17/2015 | Aboriginal Health, Children & youth, Indigenous health, Métis health, 2.6 Recommend Action, Report, NCCAH

The newly released report, Sharing their Stories: Narratives of Young Métis Parents and Elders about Parenting, is based on discussions with eighteen Métis parents, aspiring parents and grandparents in British Columbia over the course of 2009 and 2010. This resource documents and analyzes Métis narratives on parenting within the context of their unique historical and contemporary experiences.

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Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit: The role of Indigenous knowledge in supporting wellness in Inuit communities in Nunavut

Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit (IQ) is the term used to describe Inuit epistemology or the Indigenous knowledge of the Inuit. The term translates directly as “that which Inuit have always known to be true.” It is the foundation upon which social/emotional, spiritual, cognitive and physical well-being is built. This fact sheet explores the relevance of Inuit traditional knowledge for health and well-being in Inuit communities, and the potential for Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit to be used as a foundation for health and wellness policy and programs.

(also available in Inuktitut)

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