NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Incorporating Health in Urban Planning: Quebec City Case Study

The province of Québec was one of the first jurisdictions in Canada to introduce HIA to support decision making. Québec government policy directions for land use planning require improving the quality of life in urban settings by taking into account, among other things, health, safety, and environmental protection. In addition, various government policies and programs recommend the use of HIA. These include Québec’s Public Health Program (2015-2025) and the policy for Population Health Improvement (2016). Given this favourable context, the municipality of Québec initiated an HIA implementation project as a new way of improving its citizens’ quality of life. The key objectives of this ongoing project are to perform HIAs of different scales (regional, local, site-specific) within the context of existing urban planning processes, to build regional intersectoral capacity, and to assess HIA implementation within urban planning.

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Guest Blog: Training and Support for Managing Drinking Water Systems in First Nations Communities in Ontario

As of September 2019, there were 56 long-term drinking water advisories (LTDWA) for public systems on First Nations reserves across Canada. These are either Boil Water advisories or Do Not Consume advisories that have been in effect for more than a year. Of these 56 LTDWA, more than half have been in effect for over a decade and while this is a cross-Canada issue, there is a greater number in Ontario (42) than all other provinces combined.

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Indigenous Disaster Response

First Nations communities may be disproportionately impacted by a variety of emergencies and disasters, including floods, wildfires, and crude oil spills in their traditional territories.The aim of this topic page is to provide Indigenous communities and environmental health professionals with resources that describe and improve upon the current state of emergency response at the community-, provincial-, and federal-level. Case studies are provided to show the ways in which standard practice has been problematic (e.g., effects of evacuation on kin relationships and land-based activities). Finally, we have included a number of reports that reflect on past events in Indigenous communities, and provide powerful examples for Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities alike trying to recover from disasters.

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Psychosocial impacts: resources for mitigation, response and recovery

All disasters --natural or technological-- can adversely affect the health and well-being of community members and response workers involved. Because of local and global transformations (climate change, conflicts, migration, urbanization, aging, etc.), these public health impacts are expected to grow over the coming decades. Psychosocial effects refer to the adverse psychological and social outcomes of a disaster or emergency. This publication includes a list of NCCEH resources and external resources related to this theme.

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Wading through the mire: Keeping up with new and changing...

Over the past year there have been nine new consultations and announcement of eleven new or updated Canadian Drinking Water Guidelines. Keeping up with consultations and announcements can be a challenge for those involved in assessment of drinking water quality and management of drinking water supplies, raising questions of what type of preparations and responses are needed to ensure that drinking water guidelines are met and public health is protected.

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Risks and vulnerabilities due to climate change in Canada: New evidence and HealthADAPT

Canada's changing climate is accelerating at an alarming rate. This results in significant threats on our health and well-being, infrastructure, ecological integrity, and economies. This webinar addresses new evidence of health impacts from climate change, the next national health assessment and Canada's HealthADAPT initiative that includes 10 local health authorities.

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