NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Incorporating Health in Urban Planning: Quebec City Case Study

The province of Québec was one of the first jurisdictions in Canada to introduce HIA to support decision making. Québec government policy directions for land use planning require improving the quality of life in urban settings by taking into account, among other things, health, safety, and environmental protection. In addition, various government policies and programs recommend the use of HIA. These include Québec’s Public Health Program (2015-2025) and the policy for Population Health Improvement (2016). Given this favourable context, the municipality of Québec initiated an HIA implementation project as a new way of improving its citizens’ quality of life. The key objectives of this ongoing project are to perform HIAs of different scales (regional, local, site-specific) within the context of existing urban planning processes, to build regional intersectoral capacity, and to assess HIA implementation within urban planning.

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Family violence as a social determinant of First Nations, Inuit and Métis health

This fact sheet explores family violence as a determinant of health for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis individuals, families and communities. It provides an overview of the potential physical health, mental health and social impacts of family violence on individuals across the life span. It also examines the prevalence of various types of family violence, the risk factors that contribute to family violence generally, and the unique context that increases the vulnerability of Indigenous women to family violence specifically.

Addressing family violence in Indigenous communities is a complex issue because of the diverse socio-economic, geographic, political, cultural and historical barriers that operate at the individual, family, community and system levels. The fact sheet then examines barriers that inhibit Indigenous victims of violence from reporting it, prevent them from leaving violent situations, and constrain efforts to effectively reduce family violence within Indigenous communities. The fact sheet concludes by presenting a wide-array of promising approaches for family violence prevention and intervention in these settings. These approaches are multi-faceted and multi-dimensional, targeted at the level of individuals, communities, systems and policy and operating across multiple domains (legal, education, health and social services).

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Psychosocial impacts: resources for mitigation, response and recovery

All disasters --natural or technological-- can adversely affect the health and well-being of community members and response workers involved. Because of local and global transformations (climate change, conflicts, migration, urbanization, aging, etc.), these public health impacts are expected to grow over the coming decades. Psychosocial effects refer to the adverse psychological and social outcomes of a disaster or emergency. This publication includes a list of NCCEH resources and external resources related to this theme.

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Reaching Underserved Populations: Leveraging Point-of-Care Tests for Sexually Transmitted and Blood-Borne Infections to Explore New Program Options in Canada

Point-of-care testing (POCT) is one solution for rethinking testing and screening strategies. POCT offers the flexibility to perform medical diagnostic testing outside the clinical laboratory in close proximity to where the patient is receiving care. It can be performed in a variety of settings including hospitals, clinics, physician’s offices, pharmacies, ambulances, nursing and long-term care facilities, or the patient’s residence, bringing diagnostics closer to people, especially to populations who are not currently using health services for many different reasons including, stigma, discrimination, criminalization, and geographic isolation.

While there is interest in expanding POCT in Canada, translating research and evidence into POCT policies and programs remains a challenge. To support national efforts to improve sexually transmitted and blood borne infections (STBBIs) screening and support awareness building for equitable access to and uptake of new diagnostic technologies for STBBIs, the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCCID) commissioned this evidence review on POCT as it relates to the Canadian context. This review is the first of several projects NCCID is conducting, and is intended to summarize POC technologies and devices that are currently used, on the market, approved or available in Canada, or in the pipeline.

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Towards healthy homes for all: What the RentSafe findings mean for public health in Canada

Phipps, E. and the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health | 12/31/2017 | Advocacy, Community Engagement, Environmental Health, Housing, Intersectoral Action, Social determinants of health and health equity Summary NCCDH

This summary document provides an overview of recent work by RentSafe, a program under the Canadian Partnership for Children’s Health and the Environment (CPCHE), including recent findings and recommendations that can inform public health action on housing as a social determinant of health.

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