NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Collection of Adapted Summaries of Public Health Ethics Frameworks and Very Short Case Studies

The NCCHPP has started to produce and to gather together adapted frameworks and cases to help familiarize practitioners with frameworks and with ethical deliberation. To date the NCCHPP proposes seven frameworks and six cases, and will be adding to these over time.

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Evaluating the Carbon Monoxide Monitoring and Response Framework in Long-term Care Facilities: A Brief Guide

This guide is intended for public health practitioners, facility/property maintenance managers, risk managers, occupational hygienists, clinicians, or other persons working at long-term care facilities (residential care facilities, nursing homes, seniors’ residences, care occupancies, etc.)

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Using a hierarchy of evidence to assess chemical health risks of artificial turf

Over the past 40 years, artificial turf has become common in public and private settings. Compared to natural turf, artificial turf is easier to maintain, requires less water and no fertilizer, and provides a year-round access to playing surfaces. This is presumed to have important public health benefits by promoting physical activity and access to recreational space, although detailed research into benefits is lacking. However, artificial turf has potential drawbacks that range from environmental risks (e.g., chemical leaching to waterways), physical hazards (e.g., heat exposure and increased rates of injury), and finally toxicological hazards. Public risk perception around artificial turf has been amplified by a recent documentary claiming to have found an increased incidence of cancer among young adults playing soccer on artificial turf. As a result of this widespread use and growing public concern, public health agencies are frequently asked to weigh the risks and benefits of artificial turf facilities. However, this is challenging given that relatively few studies addressed artificial turf health impacts. Furthermore, data on the presence or release of certain toxic compounds is often discussed without reference to exposure scenarios. The aim of this document is to facilitate public health decision-making by discussing the strengths and limitations of the methods used to study the chemical risks of artificial turf, and how these studies contribute to our developing understanding of artificial turf health risks.

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Guide for Implementing the Carbon Monoxide Monitoring and Response Framework in Long-term Care Facilities

This guide is intended for public health practitioners, facility/property maintenance managers, risk managers, occupational hygienists, clinicians, or other persons working at long-term care facilities (residential care facilities, nursing homes, seniors’ residences, care occupancies, etc.) who would like to implement a program to reduce the risk of indoor carbon monoxide (CO) exposure to residents and staff. This document provides an overview of the Carbon Monoxide Monitoring and Response Framework (the “Framework”), the rationale for implementation in long-term care facilities, recommended steps for implementation, and sample resources. The information in this document should be adapted to suit the user’s context and resources within their organization.

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NCCEH mould investigation toolkit

Public Health Inspectors (PHIs) and Environmental Health Officers (EHOs) across Canada have different responsibilities, policies, and guidelines when it comes to investigating public inquiries about mould in indoor environments. Some PHIs/EHOs conduct initial walkthroughs only, some conduct comprehensive investigations, and others educate the public about next steps without conducting any field evaluation themselves. This toolkit provides PHIs and EHOs with some of the tools for evaluating indoor environments for mould (and other microorganisms), providing information, conducting walkthrough investigations, and understanding laboratory and consultant reports that they may be asked to review. This toolkit is meant to be a living document as new information becomes available and new tools are discovered or created. It is the NCCEH’s intention to enlist the help of PHIs, EHOs, and content experts to keep this toolkit current and useful.

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Understanding Policy Developments and Choices Through the “3-i” Framework: Interests, Ideas and Institutions

This document introduces the “3-i” framework, a theoretical framework that helps explore how interests, ideas, and institutions interact to influence, and ultimately, form policy developments and choices. By bringing together three of the most common factors for explaining public policy development processes, this framework constitutes a relevant theoretical instrument for public health practitioners looking to better understand and influence policy making.

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A Logical Modelling Framework for Infection

This document provides details of the proposed logical framework for influenza infection, including several modules for public health interventions and their effects in prevention and control of illness. These interventions include vaccination, use of antiviral drugs, and hospitalization. The aim of this logical framework is to enhance the utility and uptake of modelling for public health responses by building a conceptual framework for common assumptions, plausible interventions, disease outcomes, and the impact of control measures at various stages of infection.

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Health Inequalities and Social Determinants of Aboriginal Peoples Health

Authors Charlotte Reading, PhD, and Fred Wien, PhD, use available data to describe health inequalities experienced by diverse Aboriginal peoples in Canada, linking social determinants to health inequalities. Many of these determinants, such as poverty, substandard housing, and barriers to education, are rooted in contexts specific to Indigenous peoples, including a history of colonization impacting culture, languages, land rights and self-determination. The authors present a conceptual framework for understanding social determinants across the lifespan, and note that complex interactions between social determinants and health are just starting to be mapped out and demonstrated empirically by researchers.

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