NCC PORTAL

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Overcoming barriers to culturally safe and appropriate dementia care services and supports for Indigenous peoples in Canada

National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health | 10/17/2018 | Aboriginal Health, Cultural safety, First Nations health, Indigenous health, Report, NCCAH Resource List

As individuals age, memory loss can sometimes occur, resulting from both the natural aging process as well as from medical conditions like Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias that are progressively degenerative and irreversible. Dementias can affect an individual’s daily functioning and quality of life, as well as place a significant burden on family caregivers. While little is known about dementias among Indigenous populations in Canada, they are recognized as an emerging health issue in these communities. The Indigenous seniors population, while proportionately smaller than the general Canadian population, has been growing rapidly and rates of dementias are expected to increase due to a higher prevalence of risk factors in the development of the disease, including diabetes, midlife hypertension and obesity, physical inactivity, lower levels of education, and smoking. Further, Indigenous people face a host of barriers in accessing health care, including access to dementia care services and supports.

This paper aims to identify the challenges and burdens Indigenous people in Canada face in accessing culturally safe and appropriate dementia care services and supports, and suggests ways of overcoming these challenges. It begins by providing an overview of the general challenges Indigenous seniors face in accessing health services, then summarizes the literature on Indigenous perspectives of aging well and caring for loved ones with dementia, as understanding these perspectives is essential for developing programs and services that are responsive to their needs. Key elements of a culturally safe framework for dementia care for Indigenous communities and examples of innovative dementia care services for Indigenous peoples concludes the paper.

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The built environment: Understanding how physical environments influence the health and well-being of First Nations peoples living on-reserve

National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health | 04/17/2018 | Aboriginal Health, Built environment, Report, NCCAH

This paper summarizes what is known about how the built environment influences the health and well-being of First Nations reserve communities. Although the built environment is large in scope this paper focuses in five distinct areas including:

  • housing;
  • water and wastewater management;
  • food security;
  • active living; and
  • transportation.

Each of these elements are discussed in detail with specific attention to the health, well-being and safety concerns when poorly funded, maintained or absent from First Nations reserve communities. The paper starts by introducing how Indigenous peoples in Canada deliberately planned and designed their communities so as to thrive within their territories prior to colonization. It then turns to how colonization altered Indigenous peoples’ home and community environments thereby contributing to many of the on-going social and health inequities currently experienced by them. The paper concludes with some advances and success to improve the built environments of on-reserve communities.

 

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Menopause and Indigenous women in Canada: The State of Current Research

National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health | 03/07/2018 | Aboriginal Health, Indigenous health, Indigenous knowledges, Sex and gender, Report, NCCAH

This study, authored by Regine Halseth, Dr. Charlotte Loppie and Nicole Robinson, aims to identify and summarize the state of research on menopause and Indigenous women in Canada; suggest how this existing knowledge can be applied in practice; and identify where further research is required.

Specifically, the study identifies and summarizes published research on the characteristics of menopause; Indigenous women’s perceptions and experiences of menopause; strategies for addressing challenges associated with changes during peri- and post-menopause; and health outcomes associated with menopause among Indigenous women in Canada. The study concludes with a number of recommendations to optimize the health and wellness of Indigenous women throughout the menopausal transition.

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Commentary on POCT for HIV/STBBI : an analysis of contextual factors impeding implementation in Canada

As Canada gears up to achieving the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets for HIV/AIDS, an underlying obstacle remains: detecting HIV in the 20% of individuals who remain unaware of their HIV sero-status. In this commentary, we make a case for a greater use of point-of-care technologies (POCTs) , their versatility of use across Canada, and potential for decentralized deployment, which will increase access and improve detection rates, and thus help achieve UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets.

Further, to effectively control HIV/STBBI syndemics, we call for the following: i) increased funding for combined POCT initiatives, ii) scale-up of successful POCT pilots into provincial screening programs, iii) approval of POCTs to increase choice, availability, reduce costs, iv) training/certification of professionals on POCTs, and finally, v) making POCTs widely available nationwide for expanded access and health equity.

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An Introduction to Punctuated Equilibrium: A Model for Understanding Stability and Dramatic Change in Public Policies - Nouvelles Du Site

National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy | 01/22/2018 | Healthy public policy, Policy, Public health roles, Report, NCCHPP

In this document, we look at the “Punctuated Equilibrium” model, which aims to explain why public policies tend to be characterized by long periods of stability punctuated by short periods of radical change. This model can help public health actors understand why governments are sometimes receptive to evidence and discussion leading to significant policy change, whereas at other times, government seems to be less receptive to change and only open to making minor adjustments. This model can also help guide the actions and strategies that public health actors can use to influence public policy. To this end, we will provide some insights on how public health actors can use the punctuated equilibrium model to analyze situations and identify opportune moments and strategies for acting upon policies.

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A gaps analysis to improve health equity knowledge and practices

This gap analysis by the NCCDH focuses attention on the most pressing needs in advancing health equity in public health. It offers guidance for researchers, policy-makers, government decision-makers and public health practitioners.

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Building a culture of equity in Canadian public health: An environmental scan

This third environmental scan from the NCCDH responds to recent concerns about the Canadian health sector’s significant decline in commitment to public health programs and services. The scan explores implications for the public health sector in undertaking effective action to address the social determinants of health and improve health equity in this context.

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The Advisors of Policy Makers: Who Are They, How Do They Handle Scientific Knowledge and What Can We Learn About How to Share Such Knowledge with Them?

When one wishes to share public health knowledge in the hope of influencing public policy development, are policy makers the most relevant actors to target? Despite being often overlooked, the advisors of policy makers play an important role in public policy development. Moreover, when scientific knowledge is used in that process, advisors are the ones who handle such knowledge. This literature review analyzes 70 documents that focus on the observations of advisors themselves, or of actors who rub shoulders with them. It sketches the profile of these advisors: some of them are public servants in departments or in local governments, while others are political advisors in ministerial offices or in the legislative branch. Our paper then describes the work these advisors carry out, especially as it comes to using scientific knowledge. Last, it sets out to pinpoint the influence these advisors have in political circles.

Throughout the document, we draw on findings that emerge from the literature to suggest avenues for reflection to help readers to analyze their own contexts and determine the knowledge-sharing approach most suited to their needs.

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Knowledge Sharing and Public Policy Series - Policy Makers' Advisors, Scientific Knowledge and Knowledge Sharing: Highlights of a Literature Review and Key Lessons

The NCCHPP has published an extensive literature review that deals with political actors that are often overlooked: the advisors of policy makers. The analysis we produced explores their profiles, the way they use scientific knowledge and their influence in government circles. The summary offered here outlines highlights of the analysis and key considerations for public health actors hoping to share knowledge with policy makers' advisors.

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