NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Indigenous Disaster Response

First Nations communities may be disproportionately impacted by a variety of emergencies and disasters, including floods, wildfires, and crude oil spills in their traditional territories.The aim of this topic page is to provide Indigenous communities and environmental health professionals with resources that describe and improve upon the current state of emergency response at the community-, provincial-, and federal-level. Case studies are provided to show the ways in which standard practice has been problematic (e.g., effects of evacuation on kin relationships and land-based activities). Finally, we have included a number of reports that reflect on past events in Indigenous communities, and provide powerful examples for Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities alike trying to recover from disasters.

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Psychosocial impacts: resources for mitigation, response and recovery

All disasters --natural or technological-- can adversely affect the health and well-being of community members and response workers involved. Because of local and global transformations (climate change, conflicts, migration, urbanization, aging, etc.), these public health impacts are expected to grow over the coming decades. Psychosocial effects refer to the adverse psychological and social outcomes of a disaster or emergency. This publication includes a list of NCCEH resources and external resources related to this theme.

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Oil Spills and Health

Oil spills are very complex events that, depending on where they occur, may result in acute exposures to nearby human populations. Regardless of the presence of humans, however, oil spills have the potential to produce long-term impacts on human well-being through impacts on ecosystems, food systems, livelihoods, and psychosocial effects. The aim of this topic page is gather resources to understand the potential for the physical and psychosocial impacts of oil spills. We also provide guidance from public health agencies on planning for and responding to oil spills, and resources providing important insight for risk communication during spill events.

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Resolving wicked problems: key factors and resources

This document is part of a series of documents, webinars, and workshops on wicked problems. It highlights key factors and resources for dealing with wicked problems and offers readers some practical examples for how these may be addressed. Our hope is that it will be useful to public health actors by helping to focus their approach to the specific problems their organizations are faced with and by suggesting resources that might be helpful.

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Oxford Bibliographies: Cultural Safety

This annotated online Oxford Bibliographies, written by NCCAH staff Regine Halseth, Roberta Stout, and Donna Atkinson, aims to enhance understanding of ‘cultural safety’ in health care by providing a brief overview of the most relevant literature in this field, including what cultural safety is and how it differs from other related concepts, methods to enhance learning about cultural safety, and the various health contexts in which it can be applied (policy, practice and research).

DOI: 10.1093/0B0/9780199756797-0192 | Oxford Bibliographies subscription required to access

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Overcoming barriers to culturally safe and appropriate dementia care services and supports for Indigenous peoples in Canada

National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health | 10/17/2018 | Aboriginal Health, Cultural safety, First Nations health, Indigenous health Report, Resource List NCCIH

As individuals age, memory loss can sometimes occur, resulting from both the natural aging process as well as from medical conditions like Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias that are progressively degenerative and irreversible. Dementias can affect an individual’s daily functioning and quality of life, as well as place a significant burden on family caregivers. While little is known about dementias among Indigenous populations in Canada, they are recognized as an emerging health issue in these communities. The Indigenous seniors population, while proportionately smaller than the general Canadian population, has been growing rapidly and rates of dementias are expected to increase due to a higher prevalence of risk factors in the development of the disease, including diabetes, midlife hypertension and obesity, physical inactivity, lower levels of education, and smoking. Further, Indigenous people face a host of barriers in accessing health care, including access to dementia care services and supports.

This paper aims to identify the challenges and burdens Indigenous people in Canada face in accessing culturally safe and appropriate dementia care services and supports, and suggests ways of overcoming these challenges. It begins by providing an overview of the general challenges Indigenous seniors face in accessing health services, then summarizes the literature on Indigenous perspectives of aging well and caring for loved ones with dementia, as understanding these perspectives is essential for developing programs and services that are responsive to their needs. Key elements of a culturally safe framework for dementia care for Indigenous communities and examples of innovative dementia care services for Indigenous peoples concludes the paper.

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Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis – International Resources for Canadian Public Health Personnel

NCCID has curated a list of international resources for public health personnel that can be considered and adapted for the Canadian context. As Dr. Yoav Keynan, NCCID’s Scientific Lead, notes in his commentary, Canada has not yet seen a rise in multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB, but with greater migration of people from around the world, MDR-TB may soon become an issue for public health in this country.

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