NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Mapping the Built Environment: Peel Public Health’s Healthy Development Mapping and Monitoring Project

National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health | 10/02/2018 | Environmental Health Webinar NCCEH

In this webinar, we will provide an overview of the methodology and collaborative decision-making process required to create built environment indicators, a description of the indicators, and their role in measuring the health-promoting potential of neighbourhoods in Peel. We will also present a demonstration of the Healthy Development: Monitoring Map, an online interactive story map displaying these built environment indicators and the Peel Walkability Composite Index.

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Sexually Transmitted Infections & Nursing in Indigenous Communities

The National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases, together with the Aboriginal Nurses Association of Canada, hosted a Google Hangout On-Air about culturally-safe nursing practices and STBBIs in Indigenous communities. The 1-hour webinar was co-led by Clarence Frenchman, a Nurse Manager/HIV Case Coordinator at the Ahtahkakoop Health Centre in Saskatchewan, and Albert McLeod, a cross-cultural consultant/trainer whose work includes a focus on Aboriginal peoples and HIV/AIDS.

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Influenza control: do we need a shift in our thinking?

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization recommends “influenza vaccination for all individuals aged six months and older” in Canada. But what is the evidence for universal programs? In this webinar, Dr. Richard Schabas (Chief Medical Officer of Health for Ontario from 1987-97, now the Medical Officer of Health for the Hastings & Prince Edward Counties Health Unit) explored this question, including the impact and implications of new research.

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Antimicrobial Stewardship in Long Term/Elder Care: The Case to Act, a Call to Leaders

This March 9, 2017 webinar was developed for senior leaders, decision makers and innovators in long term care—administrators, medical directors, directors of care, or program managers—in provincial, private or voluntary sector organizations. Leads were asked to invite key staff who implement antimicrobial stewardship programs (e.g. infection prevention and control specialists, or nurse practitioners).

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Data Management/Coordination & Refugee Health: Experience of Hamilton Public Health Services

NCCID’s series of public health podcasts and webinars on refugee health continued with this November 16, 2016 presentation about one Ontario city’s recent experience with data management/coordination. The City of Hamilton Public Health Services team was responsible for creating a strategy on the fly, working with several agencies to collect, collate and share such basic data as the names, ages, sex and location/address of refugees, but also vaccination status, health assessment status and dental screening results.

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Refugee Oral Health: Interim Federal Health Plan (IFHP) Coverage

In this October 18, 2016 presentation, our two presenters delved into refugee oral health, both in children and adults. Content covered key findings from Manitoba and Saskatchewan, including the oral health needs of immigrants and refugees in Winnipeg and the coverage offered by IFHP (Interim Federal Health Program), and a large scale refugee oral health program offered by the University of Saskatchewan.

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Webinar: Cultural safety for Indigenous peoples: A determinant of health

A NCCIH webinar, co-hosted with Northern Health, was held on February 17, 2016 on “Cultural safety for Indigenous peoples: A determinant of health.” Dr. Sarah de Leeuw, Associate Professor in the Northern Medical Program, University of Northern British Columbia and a Research Associate for the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health, explored how racism has manifested in the way health care services are provided to Indigenous peoples and is thus a barrier to their optimal health. Specifically, the presentation highlighted the ways in which Indigenous people have expressed their realities of experiencing racism, and discussed ways that healthcare professionals might engage with the arts and humanities in order to more deeply reflect on their thoughts about racism and Indigenous peoples. The webinar attracted great interest, with 366 participants in attendance.

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Public Health Ethics: What is it? And Why is it Important?

In this narrated web presentation of about 15 minutes, we set out to situate public health ethics with respect to normative ethics, bioethics and medical or clinical ethics, and to map the main dimensions of public health ethics and suggest why it is important.

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Rethinking Chlamydia: How can public health STI teams mange the overwhelming caseload

The sheer volume of Chlamydia cases has made it unrealistic for many urban public health STI teams to follow up with everyone via case-and-contact. And with the incidence of Chlamydia cases only rising every year, some now wonder whether their efforts are even making a difference. Rather than try to find ways to see more cases, however, the reality is that public health STI teams must ultimately reduce their Chlamydia caseloads, or risk sacrificing more urgently needed follow-up for other STIs or outreach activities to high risk groups. In this webinar, Dr. Heejune Chang walked through the ways some public health STI teams have tried to prioritize cases or reduce their workloads in the face of overwhelming Chlamydia case volumes

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Taking Stock of Crack Pipe Distribution Programs

Urban and provincial public health departments and community agencies now have over ten years’ experience with crack pipe distribution as a strategy for harm reduction, prevention of blood borne infections, and community engagement. In this webinar, Winnipeg and Ottawa offered two case examples to consider what we’ve learned about a range of program outcomes, how we measure effectiveness and features of implementation or contexts that may influence results.

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