NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Incorporating Health in Urban Planning: Quebec City Case Study

The province of Québec was one of the first jurisdictions in Canada to introduce HIA to support decision making. Québec government policy directions for land use planning require improving the quality of life in urban settings by taking into account, among other things, health, safety, and environmental protection. In addition, various government policies and programs recommend the use of HIA. These include Québec’s Public Health Program (2015-2025) and the policy for Population Health Improvement (2016). Given this favourable context, the municipality of Québec initiated an HIA implementation project as a new way of improving its citizens’ quality of life. The key objectives of this ongoing project are to perform HIAs of different scales (regional, local, site-specific) within the context of existing urban planning processes, to build regional intersectoral capacity, and to assess HIA implementation within urban planning.

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CLOSING THE CIRCLE - FALL 2019

National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health | 10/28/2019 | Indigenous health NCCIH

Tansi! The leaves have turned colour and the air is crisp in the traditional territories of the Lheidli T'enneh First Nation, upon which the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health (NCCIH) is located. It is a great time to warm up by the fire with some fresh baked bannock and hot tea, and to appreciate these colourful autumn months. This seasonal shift also gives us the chance to report on some of our recent activities.

NCCIH newsletter link | Mailing list sign up

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Video: mite achimowin - Heart Talk Introduction

Introduction - Digital Story Research Project

The short video mite achimowin: Heart Talk – First Nations Women’s Expressions of Heart Health Digital Story Research Project, provides an introduction to the project and Indigenous and biomedical models that lend to heart health and wellness.

Read the report | Read the web story | Watch on Vimeo | Listen on SoundCloud

 

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Understanding First Nations women’s heart health

Indigenous peoples generally, and First Nations women specifically, are experiencing disproportionately higher rates of chronic conditions and cardiovascular disease compared to the general Canadian population. This paper examines the context of First Nations women’s heart health, with a particular view to understanding the role of colonization in the prevalence of and risk factors for heart diseases, and in diagnosing and treating them. Beyond colonization, authors Diffey, Fontaine and Schultz situate First Nations women’s burden of heart-related illness and risk factors for the disease within a determinants of health framework, including racism and gender. They weave first hand narratives of First Nations women into the paper in order to highlight their unique perspectives and experiences of surviving cardiovascular disease as well as their cultural understandings of heart health. The paper concludes by identifying a number of strategies for closing the gap in First Nations women’s heart health, as well as the challenges and barriers that still need to be addressed.

Read the web story | Watch the videos

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Guest Blog: Training and Support for Managing Drinking Water Systems in First Nations Communities in Ontario

As of September 2019, there were 56 long-term drinking water advisories (LTDWA) for public systems on First Nations reserves across Canada. These are either Boil Water advisories or Do Not Consume advisories that have been in effect for more than a year. Of these 56 LTDWA, more than half have been in effect for over a decade and while this is a cross-Canada issue, there is a greater number in Ontario (42) than all other provinces combined.

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Family violence as a social determinant of First Nations, Inuit and Métis health

This fact sheet explores family violence as a determinant of health for First Nations, Inuit, and Métis individuals, families and communities. It provides an overview of the potential physical health, mental health and social impacts of family violence on individuals across the life span. It also examines the prevalence of various types of family violence, the risk factors that contribute to family violence generally, and the unique context that increases the vulnerability of Indigenous women to family violence specifically.

Addressing family violence in Indigenous communities is a complex issue because of the diverse socio-economic, geographic, political, cultural and historical barriers that operate at the individual, family, community and system levels. The fact sheet then examines barriers that inhibit Indigenous victims of violence from reporting it, prevent them from leaving violent situations, and constrain efforts to effectively reduce family violence within Indigenous communities. The fact sheet concludes by presenting a wide-array of promising approaches for family violence prevention and intervention in these settings. These approaches are multi-faceted and multi-dimensional, targeted at the level of individuals, communities, systems and policy and operating across multiple domains (legal, education, health and social services).

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