NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Cyanobacteria and Drinking Water

Juliette O'Keeffe, Victoria (Tory) Colling | 03/27/2019 | Contaminants and hazards , Environmental Health, Food, Webinar, NCCEH

There is a growing concern regarding cyanobacteria in surface waters and the risks of cyanobacteria entering our drinking water treatment systems. This webinar discusses the challenges and knowledge gaps for treating cyanobacteria in small drinking water systems and summarize the results of a pilot testing project. The Centre’s pilot testing project investigated the effect of small drinking water treatment technologies on the removal of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins using a natural bloom event.

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NCCEH Ron de Burger Student Award Winners

Amber Gillespie, Presentation 1: Exploring the Relationship between the Built Environment and Social Isolation and Loneliness: Implications for Public Policy

Saarah Hussain, Presentation 2: Computer Keyboards Transmitting More Than Words: A Knowledge Synthesis of Computer Keyboards in Hospitals as a Reservoir for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection

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Unwrapped – Plastic Food Contact Articles And Chemical Food Safety

National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health | 11/01/2018 | Environmental Health, Food, Webinar, NCCEH

This webinar will focus on PFCA and chemical food safety in food service and retail environments. Issues discussed include prescribed uses of food grade plastics and chemical migration risk. Examples of commonly observed unsafe practices and safer alternatives will be provided as will an overview of trends and gaps in policy. A brief discussion of EPH–relevant issues in plastics, in particular microplastics will also be given.

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Food Deserts and Food Swamps: A Primer

Our food environments, which include the food that is available to us in our day-to-day environments, is a determinant of what we eat as individuals.

This document is intended for environmental public health professionals, including medical health officers and public health inspectors, as well as other public health professionals such as public health dietitians and health promoters, whose work may include healthy built environments or healthy communities. The document introduces food environments such as food deserts and food swamps, discusses the related health implications, provides the rationale for consideration by non-nutrition professionals, and highlights some opportunities for action and collaboration with provincial and municipal governments, as well as business operators.

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Fact sheet: Environmental Health Risks of Personal Cannabis Cultivation

Personal cultivation as described by the Cannabis Act (2017) will permit adults to cultivate up to four cannabis plants per household as of October 17, 2018. The Canadian Federal government will be responsible for regulating and enforcing industry-wide standards for commercial producers, while the provinces and territories will be responsible for overseeing the distribution and sale of cannabis, as well as developing guidelines and rules for growing cannabis at home. This fact sheet identifies health and safety concerns that may be relevant for personal cultivation and recommends key messages to help mitigate some of these risks.

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Mapping the Built Environment: Peel Public Health’s Healthy Development Mapping and Monitoring Project

National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health | 10/03/2018 | Environmental Health, Webinar, NCCEH

In this webinar, we will provide an overview of the methodology and collaborative decision-making process required to create built environment indicators, a description of the indicators, and their role in measuring the health-promoting potential of neighbourhoods in Peel. We will also present a demonstration of the Healthy Development: Monitoring Map, an online interactive story map displaying these built environment indicators and the Peel Walkability Composite Index.

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Growing at Home: Health and Safety Concerns for Personal Cannabis Cultivation

Personal cultivation as described by the proposed Cannabis Act (2017) will permit adults to cultivate up to four cannabis plants per household. This provision is intended to both promote equity by facilitating access to legal cannabis, particularly when retail outlets are difficult to access, and to undercut the black market. However, indoor cultivation and processing of cannabis may also introduce or exacerbate certain environmental health risks in the home. This document identifies health and safety concerns that may be relevant to personal cultivation after legalization – that is, legal home growing and the associated health risks.

Although this information may be of relevance to the public at large, the evidence presented here has been synthesized and organized for policy- and decision-makers, environmental and medical health officers, and other public health professionals. This review thus serves as a launching point for considering both wide-scale and regionally oriented preventive actions to mitigate the environmental health risks that may arise from growing at home.

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