NCC PORTAL

Find resources from across the six NCC's

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The Portal brings together a broad selection of resources from all six of the National Collaborating Centres (NCCs). Search for resources by clicking on NCC, Type, Topic and Core Competency.

Please note: the Portal is not exhaustive and not all resources are indexed by PHAC Core Competency.

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Knowledge Broker Mentoring Program

Launched in 2014, the Knowledge Broker (KB) Mentoring program was developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT) to advance the uptake and use of evidence informed decision making (EIDM) in Canada within the public health sector. This project combines in-person and online support to train public health practitioners to develop knowledge and capacity in the theory and practice of EIDM.

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Food Deserts and Food Swamps: A Primer

Our food environments, which include the food that is available to us in our day-to-day environments, is a determinant of what we eat as individuals.

This document is intended for environmental public health professionals, including medical health officers and public health inspectors, as well as other public health professionals such as public health dietitians and health promoters, whose work may include healthy built environments or healthy communities. The document introduces food environments such as food deserts and food swamps, discusses the related health implications, provides the rationale for consideration by non-nutrition professionals, and highlights some opportunities for action and collaboration with provincial and municipal governments, as well as business operators.

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Fact sheet: Environmental Health Risks of Personal Cannabis Cultivation

Personal cultivation as described by the Cannabis Act (2017) will permit adults to cultivate up to four cannabis plants per household as of October 17, 2018. The Canadian Federal government will be responsible for regulating and enforcing industry-wide standards for commercial producers, while the provinces and territories will be responsible for overseeing the distribution and sale of cannabis, as well as developing guidelines and rules for growing cannabis at home. This fact sheet identifies health and safety concerns that may be relevant for personal cultivation and recommends key messages to help mitigate some of these risks.

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Evidence-Informed Decision Making Casebook

Every day in Canada, research evidence is used to inform decisions in public health. We’ve collected stories from across the country that highlight the use of evidence to inform public health practice, programs and policy in Canada.

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Growing at Home: Health and Safety Concerns for Personal Cannabis Cultivation

Personal cultivation as described by the proposed Cannabis Act (2017) will permit adults to cultivate up to four cannabis plants per household. This provision is intended to both promote equity by facilitating access to legal cannabis, particularly when retail outlets are difficult to access, and to undercut the black market. However, indoor cultivation and processing of cannabis may also introduce or exacerbate certain environmental health risks in the home. This document identifies health and safety concerns that may be relevant to personal cultivation after legalization – that is, legal home growing and the associated health risks.

Although this information may be of relevance to the public at large, the evidence presented here has been synthesized and organized for policy- and decision-makers, environmental and medical health officers, and other public health professionals. This review thus serves as a launching point for considering both wide-scale and regionally oriented preventive actions to mitigate the environmental health risks that may arise from growing at home.

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Identifying and Addressing the Public Health Risks of Splash Parks

Splash parks, also known as splash pads, spray parks, or wet decks, have gained in popularity over the last decade. These interactive parks are artificially created depressions or basins into which water is sprayed, splashed or poured onto visitors; water is not permitted to accumulate, but instead drains immediately out of the play area. Splash parks may take one of two basic designs, which influences the associated public health risks. Non-recirculating or flow-through parks discharge the water directly to waste and present a relatively low risk to their users as the design is based on using fresh potable water. In contrast, recirculating parks collect water in an underground tank, apply some form of water treatment, and re-use the water again. This presents an increased risk of contamination and disease transmission that can be mitigated through proper design and operation.

The objective of this document is to identify risks to public health posed by splash parks, the factors that contribute to this risk, outline practices that can mitigate these risks, and summarize the existing regulatory environment for these facilities. It focuses on epidemiological risks rather than physical hazards such as slip and fall injuries, heat stroke, and foot lacerations.

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Tackling Poverty in Indigenous Communities in Canada

For First Nation, Inuit and Métis peoples in Canada, who experience a disproportionate burden of illness, poverty is both deep and widespread. This paper briefly examines the breadth and depth of poverty in Indigenous communities using standard economic indicators. The paper shows some of the ways in which poverty contributes to lack of community health and well-being. It concludes by identifying a number of different strategies for tackling poverty in its economic dimensions, including some that have worked well in Indigenous communities.

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Antimicrobial Stewardship in Long Term/Elder Care: The Case to Act, a Call to Leaders

This March 9, 2017 webinar was developed for senior leaders, decision makers and innovators in long term care—administrators, medical directors, directors of care, or program managers—in provincial, private or voluntary sector organizations. Leads were asked to invite key staff who implement antimicrobial stewardship programs (e.g. infection prevention and control specialists, or nurse practitioners).

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Integrated LTBI Care for Refugees: Successes & Challenges at BridgeCare Clinic in Winnipeg

A centuries-old disease, tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health concern globally and the World Health Organization (WHO) is calling for enhanced efforts to eliminate TB worldwide. In this case study, we share the story of the success of BridgeCare Clinic, a model of integrated TB services for government-assisted refugees for its approach to improving latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) treatment completion outcomes in priority populations.

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